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ADA Compliant Signs in Kansas City

Did you know when it comes to manufacturing and installing ADA compliant signs there are several things to consider besides just the Braille lettering.

Color

The colors chosen for background as well at the tactile features of the sign must contrast as much as possible.  That is the reason you see a lot of restroom signs that are blue with white, black with white, and ivory with black tactile features.  The contrast in color allows a person with low vision to better view the sign.

One way to “generally” ensure you are in compliance is to have a dark background color (i.e. black) with a light colored (i.e. white) tactile features.

 

When designing an ADA compliant sign, the designer needs to take into consideration there are really 3 sections to each sign.  One area for the pictogram, one for the tactile lettering, and one reserved for the braille lettering.  Consistency in the design ensures a person who is visually impaired can touch the sign and then know where to find the information conveyed on the sign.

Location

The mounting height for tactile signs (signs with not only Braille lettering, but also raised pictograms or lettering) must be mounted as follows:

Minimum height: 48” from the floor to the baseline of the lowest level of tactile copy

Maximum height:  60” from the floor to the baseline of the highest level of tactile copy

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Not only is the height important, but also the placement on the wall.  In general signs should be located on the strike side not hinge side of the door.  If there is not enough room, then it can be located on the nearest adjacent wall.  Other locations can be used depending upon the type of door.

Types of Braille

Braille is a system of raised dots arranged in cells. Any combination of one to six dots may be raised within each cell, and the number and position of the raised dots within a cell conveys to the reader the letter, word, number, or symbol the cell represents. There are 64 possible combinations of raised dots within a single cell. Due to the varying needs of Braille readers, there are three different grades of Braille.

Grade 1

Each possible arrangement of dots within a cell represents only one letter, number, punctuation sign, or special Braille composition sign – it is a one-to-one conversion. Individual cells cannot represent words or abbreviations in this grade of Braille.

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bchars2

 

Grade 2

Introduced as a space-saving alternative to grade 1 Braille. In grade 2 Braille, a cell can represent a shortened form of a word. Many cell combinations have been created to represent common words, making this the most popular of the grades of Braille and is the type of Braille used in the design and manufacturing of ADA signs.

b_grade2

 

Grade 3

The last of the grades of Braille, grade 3, is essentially a system of Braille shorthand. Because it has not been standardized, it is not used in publications.

 

With all of the different requirements for ADA signs it can be very confusing.  Pathway Signs and Graphics is here to help you chose the best interior signage for your business or office space.

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Do You Need ADA Compliant Signs in your Kansas City Office?

Ever since the 1990s, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has protected the rights of those living with disabilities. While it is common knowledge that public buildings must have doorways wide enough to allow access to visitors in wheelchairs, it is not as commonly known that the rules of the Act also apply to business signage.

If you have questions related to ADA compliant signs Missouri or Kansas officials will accept give Pathway Signs and Graphics a call and we will be happy to help answer your questions. To make sure that our clients have all the information they need, we have devised a question and answer sheet for this occasion.

Q: Where do I need ADA compliant signage in my building?

A: A room that is for the express use of the public must be identified by compliant signage. Any space that must feature emergency wayfinding signage is required to have these signs comply with the Act. Moreover, all room markers that identify permanent spaces – like bathrooms and kitchens – must meet ADA standards. If the use of a room changes frequently or if it is not set up to fulfill today’s function in the near future, there is no need for ADA signage.

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Q: What types of signs are acceptable?

A: The state recognizes appropriate markers that make it easier for the disabled to decipher the message you seek to communicate via your signage. To this end, officials suggest the use of signs that feature strong color contrasts, Braille language and larger character sizing. Please note that the mounting heights for signs also determine whether they meet the standards set forth by the Act. While overhead signs do not call for the inclusion of Braille, they do have to follow the size and color requirements.

Q: Does each and every sign have to be compliant?

A: Not necessarily. If you are putting up a temporary sign for less than a week, it does not have to be compliant with the Act. Exemptions also exist for menus, signs that are not in areas open to the public and the displays of company names.

Q: Is it possible to integrate ADA signs for Kansas City,into an already existing signage setup?

A: Yes, it is. Typogaphy, reflective requirements and sizing can be seamlessly integrated into the look and overall feel of your current wayfinding, directory and other interior or exterior markers. The customized shapes of these signs easily fit into other building elements. High-resolution colors beautifully match the same type of coloration that you have chosen for other markers. Pick all-metal construction or brushed metal finishes to match your current setup and also to bring chic or pizzazz to your building’s interior.

Now that you know a little bit more about the ADA and what it means for your business’ signage compliance, do not hesitate to give Pathway Signs and Graphics a call. 3We can get your company’s signs revamped according to the Act in little time. Before long, all of your guests and customers will have the opportunity to enjoy a collection of new signs that are as beautiful as they are functional.

Contact Us

Do You Need ADA Compliant Signs in the Kansas City Area?

Ever since the 1990s, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has protected the rights of those living with disabilities. While it is common knowledge that public buildings must have doorways wide enough to allow access to visitors in wheelchairs, it is not as commonly known that the rules of the Act also apply to business signage.

Pathway Signs and Graphics frequently gets calls from area businesses that have plenty of questions related to ADA compliant signs that Missouri and Kansas officials will accept. Here are many questions that are frequently asked.

Q: Where do I need ADA compliant signage in my building?

A: A room that is for the express use of the public must be identified by compliant signage. Any space that must feature emergency wayfinding signage is required to have these signs comply with the Act.  All permanent spaces, like bathrooms and kitchens, must meet ADA standards. If the use of a room changes frequently or if a room is being remodeled or changing functions in the near future, there is no need for ADA signage.

Q: What types of signs are acceptable?

A: The state recognizes appropriate markers that make it easier for the disabled to decipher the message you seek to communicate with your signage. Officials suggest the use of signs that feature strong color contrasts, Braille language and larger character sizing. The mounting heights for signs also determine whether they meet the standards set forth by the Act. While overhead signs do not call for the inclusion of Braille, they do have to follow the size and color requirements.

Q: Does each and every sign have to be compliant?

A: Not necessarily. If you are putting up a temporary sign for less than a week, it does not have to be compliant with the Act. Exemptions also exist for menus, signs that are not in areas open to the public and the displays of company names.

Q: Is it possible to integrate ADA signs into an already existing signage setup?

A: Yes, it is. Reflective requirements and sizing can be seamlessly integrated into the look and overall feel of your current wayfinding, directory and other interior or exterior markers. The customized shapes of these signs easily fit into other building elements. High-resolution colors beautifully match the same type of coloration that you have chosen for other markers. Pick all-metal construction or brushed metal finishes to match your current setup and also to bring a great look to your building’s interior.

 

 

 

Now that you know a little bit more about the ADA and what it means for your business’ signage compliance, do not hesitate to give us a call at Pathway Signs and Graphics. We can get your company’s signs revamped according to the Act in little time. Before long, all of your guests and customers will have the opportunity to enjoy a collection of new signs that are as beautiful as they are functional.

Contact Us